Seville

Situated on the banks of the Guadalquivir River, Seville has a rich Moorish heritage, and used to be a prosperous port that carried out trade with the Americas.

The streets and squares in the historic quarter of the capital of Andalusia are lively and busy. They treasure many constructions that have the World Heritage designation, and many districts are full of traditional culture, like Triana and La Macarena.

Seville is a prominent business and service centre in the south of Spain and has many hotels distributed all over the city which enable visitors to discover endless attractions. Museums and art centres, theme parks, cinemas, theatres and clubs are some of the many leisure options that a great city like Seville holds.

Without forgetting, of course, the numerous terraces, inns and bars where visitors can practise one of the most deeply-rooted and tasty traditions in the city: “Going out for tapas”.

Another good excuse to come to the Sevillian capital are the festivals.

The celebrations of Easter Week and Feria de Abril (the April Fair), which have been declared of National Tourist Interest.

This reflects the devotion and folklore of the people of Seville, always open and friendly to visitors.

But Seville’s appeal does not end there, as the city is also the starting point for the many cultural routes the province offers, such as the Roman Bética Route or the Washington Irving route.

The visitor will also discover the immense natural wealth of this region, which sits halfway between two continents, in natural treasures such as the Doñana Nature Reserve.

Declared a World Heritage Site and Biosphere Reserve by UNESCO, and the Sierra Norte Nature Reserve.

They will be the ideal setting for practising outdoor sports, including hiking, horse riding, and cycling routes.

If, on the other hand, golf is your sport of choice, then you will be glad to know that Seville has four excellent golf courses in its vicinity.

The cathedral stands on the site of what was –in the 12th century– the Great Mosque. Today, the only part which remains of this structure is the minaret, also known as the Giralda due to the weather vane added to the top in the 16th century.

The Abluciones courtyard and today’s Puerta del Perdón door are also parts of the old mosque. It was converted into a Christian church when the city was conquered by Ferdinand III of Castile in 1248. Several stages of building can be seen, with examples of the Mudéjar, Gothic, Renaissance, Baroque and Neo-classical styles. Access to the cathedral is through the Plaza Virgen de los Reyes square.

It has five naves (the main nave has a height of 36 metres) and a rectangular floor plan, measuring 116 metres long and 76 metres wide. The transept rises to a maximum height of 40 metres.

The main altarpiece was built over a series of different periods, and includes pieces by the brothers Jorge Fernández Alemán and Alejo Fernández, Roque Balduque, Pedro Millán, Juan Bautista Vázquez the Elder and Pedro de Heredia.

The Renaissance-style chapter room dates from the second half of the 16th century. The main sacristy is Plateresque. The remains of Christopher Columbus lie in the cathedral.

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